Aborigines & activism : race & the coming of the sixties to by Jennifer Clark

By Jennifer Clark

This is often a fascinating learn of the tales of racial awakening in Australia that marked the arriving of the 'wind of change'. via rigorous learn, the writer indicates how supporters of Indigenous Australians and their struggles for equality driven Australia into the 60s - actually and figuratively. The booklet additionally places the Australian event of the 60s into a global point of view, portrayed as designated yet no longer in isolation. learn more... summary: this can be an attractive examine of the tales of racial awakening in Australia that marked the arrival of the 'wind of change'. via rigorous study, the writer indicates how supporters of Indigenous Australians and their struggles for equality driven Australia into the 60s - actually and figuratively. The publication additionally places the Australian adventure of the 60s into a world point of view, portrayed as detailed yet no longer in isolation

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They did not draw an official condemnation from the government. Instead, Menzies tried to ambush the debate. ⁴² This was a red herring. The real reason Menzies avoided criticising South Africa was his devotion to domestic jurisdiction. His passion was based on the same reasons that proved so convincing to HV Evatt some fifteen years earlier. Specifically, Menzies mentioned Papua New Guinea and Aborigines. He feared that if Australia condemned South Africa then, in turn, Australia would be open to international scrutiny and judgement.

Cairns had enjoyed successful careers firstly in the Victorian Police Force and then as Senior Lecturer in Economic History at the University of Melbourne before entering politics in 1955. 26 Sharpeville and the Challenge to Domestic Jurisdiction Cairns’ application to join the Communist Party was rejected because they suspected him of being an agent of the police, but he transferred his socialist and Marxist views into powerful advocacy for the Labor left. Cairns in many ways represented the intellectual idealism of the 60s.

Few members had any personal 30 Sharpeville and the Challenge to Domestic Jurisdiction or abiding concern for Aborigines other than Labor members Gordon Bryant and Kim Beazley Snr, and Liberal, WC Wentworth. Each of these men would emerge as leaders in the cause for Aboriginal advancement. It is also highly likely that Menzies was not especially moved by the Sharpeville incident simply because he carried no deeper interest in racial issues and failed to appreciate the international extent of racial change.

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